Adventures in .NET

Episode Archive

Episode Archive

136 episodes of Adventures in .NET since the first episode, which aired on September 3rd, 2019.

  • Where is your code? - .NET 119

    May 17th, 2022  |  40 mins 55 secs

    In this episode the panelists talk about source control. What is source control? How do you use it? Do you need it? As a developer today the majority of us are probably using Git in some form or fashion. Even though it feels like Git has been around forever that wasn't always the case. Shawn, Wai and Caleb remember the days before Git using SourceSafe or Subversion. Things have come a long way since the days of SourceSafe but that doesn't mean that Git is necessarily easy or intuitive. The panelists take a closer look at some of the Git commands like merge, stash, squash and rebase. Do you use source control? If so has it helped make your life easier? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Learning From Your Mistakes (PART 2) - .NET 118

    May 10th, 2022  |  43 mins 19 secs

    In a lot of codebases, security isn't a priority until it is too late. Everyone makes mistakes but the question is do you learn from your mistakes or repeat them over and over. Christos Matskas returns to the podcast to discuss some common security mistakes and better ways to make security part of your development process. Our discussion includes .NET Framework web configs, secret storage, databases, identity and more. We even go over some of the mistakes we have made in our own code and how we learned from those mistakes. Is there a mistake you made that you will never forget? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Learning From Your Mistakes (PART 1) - .NET 117

    May 3rd, 2022  |  36 mins 58 secs

    In a lot of codebases, security isn't a priority until it is too late. Everyone makes mistakes but the question is do you learn from your mistakes or repeat them over and over. Christos Matskas returns to the podcast to discuss some common security mistakes and better ways to make security part of your development process. Our discussion includes .NET Framework web configs, secret storage, databases, identity and more. We even go over some of the mistakes we have made in our own code and how we learned from those mistakes. Is there a mistake you made that you will never forget? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Insight into Azure Functions - .NET 116

    April 26th, 2022  |  30 mins 27 secs

    In today's episode Carl Layton returns to the podcast to discuss Azure Functions. What are Azure Functions and how do they work? Functions are one of the serverless compute options from Azure. You can use Functions to build web APIs, respond to database changes, manage message queues, and more. Beyond that we look at the security, performance and scaling of Azure Functions. What is it like to write code, debug and deploy Functions? What costs are involved to use Azure Functions and is it worth it for you or your company. Have you used Azure Functions? What is your experience? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • How do you interview? - .NET 115

    April 19th, 2022  |  42 mins 14 secs

    There is a lot that goes into interviewing for a job, both for the interviewer(s) and the interviewee. The panelists talk about their experiences over the years from both sides. What questions should you ask? What shouldn't you ask? Should coding be involved or not? How many interviews should you expect to have at one company? Do you cast a wide net when interviewing or do you focus on a couple of companies? We discuss all of these questions and more. What advice would you give someone interviewing for a position? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Minimal APIs Aren’t so Minimal in Power - .NET 114

    April 11th, 2022  |  40 mins 20 secs

    Cecil Philips returns to the show to discuss the power of Minimal APIs and the differences to Controllers. Also discussed are using .NET with Stripe, and use cases for .NET Interactive.

  • Designing C# with Mads Torgersen (Part 2) - .NET 113

    April 5th, 2022  |  36 mins

    In this episode we get the pleasure of picking the brain of the lead designer of C#, Mads Torgersen. Mads has been the lead designer for more than five years now and has worked on the language for over fifteen years. Our discussion covers multiple topics including the growth of C#, being backward compatible and how different languages incorporate ideas from each other. We also dig into the specifics of things like async/await, default interfaces and dynamics. On top of all that we get a peek at the future of C# and what we might see in the next couple of versions. What would you ask Mads about C# if you had the chance? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Designing C# with Mads Torgersen - .NET 112

    March 29th, 2022  |  30 mins 31 secs

    In this episode we get the pleasure of picking the brain of the lead designer of C#, Mads Torgersen. Mads has been the lead designer for more than five years now and has worked on the language for over fifteen years. Our discussion covers multiple topics including the growth of C#, being backward compatible and how different languages incorporate ideas from each other. We also dig into the specifics of things like async/await, default interfaces and dynamics. On top of all that we get a peek at the future of C# and what we might see in the next couple of versions. What would you ask Mads about C# if you had the chance? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Product Management? - .NET 111

    March 15th, 2022  |  33 mins 5 secs

    Most developers we know find project management to be a necessary evil but without it a lot of us would be stumbling around in the dark. Shawn and Caleb look back over their careers to discuss different project management methodologies. Whether it is waterfall, agile, scrum, or none of these, projects are hard to manage. Both Shawn and Caleb have seen a lot of different ways that projects can be managed or mismanaged and they have differing opinions on what works best. Join us for this episode to find out which they prefer and what allows them to focus on getting to work coding. What is your preferred project management style? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast

  • What is a BFF? - .NET 110

    March 8th, 2022  |  27 mins 42 secs

    Wai and Caleb sit down to discuss how authentication is evolving and how it works in Blazor. Identity server is now Duende server and with that comes the Backend for Frontend (BFF) pattern. From an authentication persepective this pattern can benefit SPA's because of the way it handles cookies and tokens. Caleb is in the process of integrating a .NET 6 Blazor app with Identity server 4 (IDS4) and wanted to use BFF but it isn't an option. We discuss alternatives and how those alternatives might be viewed from the business and developer perspectives. Join us and find out where Caleb ended up on his authentication journey. Have you had to handle authentication in a Blazor app? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Mastering SignalR - .NET 109

    March 1st, 2022  |  56 mins 23 secs

    Have you ever used SignalR in your development? .NET might have used it for the code you wrote and you didn't realize it. Kevin Griffin has used SignalR for multiple projects over the years and joins us to discuss how you can use it in your development. SignalR uses a pub/sub model and is great for applications that need immediate feedback. Kevin used it for a city's emergency system to provide alerts to first responders within seconds of an emergency being recorded. Like most technologies SignalR can be problematic if used incorrectly. We get to hear a couple of stories where Kevin had to work to fix troublesome SignalR implementations. Have you developed applications that could benefit from using SignalR? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.

  • Grokking gRPC - .NET 108

    February 22nd, 2022  |  34 mins 39 secs

    In today's episode Mohamad Lawand helps us try and grok gRPC. gRPC is a modern open source high performance Remote Procedure Call (RPC) framework that can run in any environment. That description doesn't really demystify what gRPC can do so Mohamad helps us fill in some of the gaps. We find out how gRPC works in .NET, how it works with HTTP, how it is different from REST and some good use cases for using it in your applications. gRPC is used by companies like Netflix and Square and is supported by the Cloud Native Computing Foundation. Have you used gRPC in your applications? Let us know on Twitter at @dotnet_Podcast.